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Kriminal tråden!


audirs2

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1 timme sedan, skrev AnTove:

Det är fascinerande att dagens kriminella inte kan låta bli att själva skapa bevisning på sociala medier, de måste skryta. Och att de alltid blir för giriga, det verkar som att de ha kunnat levat gott på sina övriga brott och kunnat leva mera under radarn.  

Tycker du att dom skall leva gott?

Sju år i folkskola, det du! Fucks ADHD!:heat:

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Precis nyss, skrev audirs2:

Tycker du att dom skall leva gott?

Absolut inte, är bara förundrad över hur korkade de är genom att ha så mycket lyx, när de lever i ett så tättbebyggt område, dokumenterar sina brott på sociala medier och även fuskar med socialbidrag när de uppenbart lever över sina inkomster. Visserligen har det kunnat leva så under långt tid fast att de satt sig själva i en omöjlig sits. Jag hoppas verkligen att de får sitta inne i många år och att man tar allt ifrån dem. Men jag är då förundrad över deras girighet och dumhet.

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3 timmar sedan, skrev smaland:

Har träffat honom och tycker inte synd om honom.

Japp, maken till arrogant jävel får man leta efter. Var på hans resort och tittade när han öppnade och mer osympatisk skitstövel får man leta efter. Men karma plockade sitt... 

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1 timme sedan, skrev Koh Changer:

Japp, maken till arrogant jävel får man leta efter. Var på hans resort och tittade när han öppnade och mer osympatisk skitstövel får man leta efter. Men karma plockade sitt... 

Hade han resort här på Koh Chang? Vilken och vart? Vore kul att åka förbi o kolla vad som blev av den... Kom hit igår landade först på White sand, mycket stängt men vissa ställen dock knökfulla med thai 

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2 timmar sedan, skrev apknug:

Hade han resort här på Koh Chang? Vilken och vart? Vore kul att åka förbi o kolla vad som blev av den... Kom hit igår landade först på White sand, mycket stängt men vissa ställen dock knökfulla med thai 

 The Elysian Pearl resort, ligger på "skuggsidan", alltså till vänster när du kommer från färjan. Kanske 20 minuters körning från White sand. Oklart om hans fru driver vidare där eller om den är beslagtagen. 

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19 timmar sedan, skrev Koh Changer:

 The Elysian Pearl resort, ligger på "skuggsidan", alltså till vänster när du kommer från färjan. Kanske 20 minuters körning från White sand. Oklart om hans fru driver vidare där eller om den är beslagtagen. 

Hans fru driver vidare.

De har nyligen bytt namn på stället.

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57 minuter sedan, skrev Surin P3:

Hans fru driver vidare.

De har nyligen bytt namn på stället.

Där ser man, åkte på den sidan förra veckan men tänkte aldrig på att kolla efter skylten vid vägen. 

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Visste inte vart jag skulle lägga denna men deras sk debut i sexbranchen gick så där. (Ni får gärna tippsa mig en bättre tråd vart man lägger in typ nyheter...)
Police walked into the middle of a pornography shoot during a raid at home in Pattaya, Thai media reports. 5 people were arrested and allegedly told police that they got into the exotic film industry due to financial problems brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic. (

Samt dessa rader är lite kul med tanke på allt som händer i landet.
Pornography is illegal in Thailand under Section 287 of the country’s Criminal Code

https://thethaiger.com/news/Pattaya/police-raid-pornography-shoot-at-Pattaya-home-5-people-arrested

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Polen går sin egen väg igen!!🤬

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The EU’s moment of truth: democracy vs autocracy 
 
By Piotor Buras, head of the Warsaw office of the European Council on Foreign Relations 

Opinions expressed are solely those of the author. 

The latest confrontation between Warsaw and Brussels is more than a judicial disagreement: it marks a key moment in the fight between the rule of law and autocracy that threatens the very essence of the European project.

Last week, Poland’s constitutional tribunal ruled that decisions of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) regarding Polish courts violate the Polish constitution. The ruling came two days after the CJEU declared that a chamber of the Polish Supreme Court does not fulfill EU criteria of an independent court and has to cease operations. The Polish authorities, in turn, said that they are not bound to follow the ruling – and simply ignored it.

Questioning the supremacy of EU law is not a minor offence. The EU is in its very essence a system of rules which requires respect and needs an ultimate arbiter when their application is disputed. However, the EU institutions are not omnipotent. The boundary between what they are allowed to do and what is reserved for the authorities of the member states is often a matter of controversy. National tribunals and governments tend to complain about the power grab by the European institutions and even question decisions taken by the CJEU.

The current conflict between Warsaw and Brussels/Luxembourg is of a different magnitude, and framing it as a defense of Polish sovereignty against a EU overreach is nonsense. The subjugation of the judiciary is a key part of the anti-democratic project of Jaroslaw Kaczynski, the leader of the ruling party Law and Justice (PiS). And the intention of the Polish authorities is nothing less than to deny the EU the power to ensure that the courts in its member states remain independent and are not subject to political pressure.

Should the EU – the Commission, CJEU and the member states – tolerate this defiance, it would pave the way for the destruction of the union. It would give member states a free hand to decide not just the structure of their judicial systems – which is the sovereign right of all countries – but also the principles they are based on. The EU is a union based upon a common market and common citizenship, but an independent judiciary is also a common good. Allowing member states to subvert it would be suicidal.

In Poland, judges have been harassed for standing up for the separation of power, for submitting questions to the CJEU and for implementing its rulings. The disciplinary system for judges is fully controlled by the minister of justice who nominates both prosecutors and judges and can personally go after each and every judge in the country.

This system, unsurprisingly condemned last week by the CJEU as violating EU principles, is used to intimidate judges, persecute those who criticise the demolition of the rule of law and ultimately to silence any form of resistance to these practices.

All this was reflected in a report published this week by the European Commission in the framework of its yearly monitoring of the rule of law. In spite of an unemotional language, the report reads like an indictment - or even a desperate cry.

“There are risks as regards the effectiveness of the fight against high-level corruption, including a risk of undue influence on corruption prosecutions for political purposes,” the paper notes about Poland. The report shows that it wasn’t a lack of knowledge but of political resolve that failed to prevent the current showdown.

The Commission has already given Warsaw until 16 August to comply with the CJEU verdict. Otherwise, Brussels will request daily financial penalties.

But the Commission must go further than issuing an ultimatum: it needs to clearly say that, as long the constitutional barriers for the application of the EU law are in place in Poland, payments from the Recovery Fund will be withheld. Moreover, the executive should trigger the newly established conditionality mechanism which is supposed to protect the EU financial interests against the risks related to deficiencies of the rule of law. Obviously, all of this will not work without the public backing from the member states.

In short, the EU needs to let the money – its most powerful argument – speak, since all more diplomatic methods have failed.

The recent escalation in Warsaw’s conflict with the EU could be the swan song of Kaczynski’s waning power. His parliamentary majority is crumbling and the return of Donald Tusk – his old political enemy – to Poland revives unpleasant memories. For Kaczynski, this is a race against time. By tightening autocratic screws, he wants to secure the power before it slips away. But yet another, after Hungary, autocracy beefed up by huge EU funds would open the way for self-destruction of the European project.

This is the moment when both the EU and Poland need a very powerful political signal that crossing undisputable red lines – the binding nature of the rule of law – can and will not be tolerated.

 

 

 

WHAT ELSE IS GOING ON?

BREXIT SPAT The European Union and the United Kingdom are once again at odds over the implementation of the Northern Ireland Protocol. London believes the current situation is untenable and has requested a major rewrite of the rules, which Brussels rejected almost instantaneously. The constant squabble over the protocol is taking centre stage in the post-Brexit political era. Six months after officially leaving the bloc, has the UK really taken back control? From trade to migration, our Brexit expert Alasdair Sandford examines the gains and losses.

FUEL TAX Among the European Commission’s sweeping plans to transform the EU’s economy and achieve climate neutrality, one particular proposal has become the subject of intense criticism: a new Emissions Trading System that will target the suppliers of fossil fuel used in buildings and road transport. Brussels says the scheme is necessary because all carbon must be taxed and phased out, but detractors argue the cost will be passed onto consumers, leading to higher prices and possibly trigger a pan-European Yellow Vest protest movement. Our Brussels bureau looks into the two sides of the growing debate.

FAR-RIGHT THREAT This week, Norway marks 10 years since far-right terror attacks killed 77 people in Oslo and the island of Utøya. Anders Breivik's bomb and shooting spree on July 22, 2011, was the country's worst peacetime slaughter and the fifth deadliest terrestrial terrorist attack in Europe. Althoug Breivik is now behind bars, Norway is still wrestling with the impact of his acts and the radical ideology that inspired them, Alice Tidey reports.

MADE IN EUROPE Decades of industrial relocation to countries with low production costs have caused damage to many regions in France. But in the small town of Revin, good news is on the horizon: the bicycle sector is ready for a comeback. Meanwhile, Brussels is rolling out plans to secure 20% of the global market for microchips by the end of the decade. “What's important for us: to get the production done here, in Europe, in our place, in order to guarantee the security of the supply chain,” EU Commissioner Thierry Breton told Euronews. 

SAFETY NET Fishing and offshore aquaculture are very risky professions, with hundreds of injuries registered every year in Europe. On moving trawlers, fishers can fall overboard unnoticed and drown. Ships can collide with obstacles and sink. In the latest episode of Ocean, Denis Loctier travels to Emilia-Romagna, Italy, to explore the measures and rules used to keep European fishers safe.

ECO-OLYMPICS After much delay and controversy, the Tokyo Summer Olympics have finally kicked off. This year, the grand event isn’t just a showcase for the greatest sporting talent on the planet, it’s also a platform for emerging technologies helping to create a more sustainable future. Beyond the already famous 18,000 beds made from recyclable cardboard, the Games intend to show the world the practical benefits of a circular economy.

PODCAST AWARD The Briefing congratulates the team of Cry Like A Boy for winning Best Digital Audio Project at the 2021 European Digital Media Awards, organised by the World Association of News Publishers (WAN-IFRA). “Love the quality of the episodes,” the judges said. “Amazing topic and great mission too.” Cry Like A Boy, an Euronews original podcast series, explores the topics of toxic masculinity and gender inequality in five African countries. Listen to all the episodes here.

IDYLLIC ESCAPES If you and your significant other are in desperate need for a much-deserved break after a full year of teleworking, Euronews Travel brings you a tantalizing selection of the best adult-only retreats across Europe. No children allowed. 

 

 

 

IT'S IN THE NUMBERS

Despite all those ominous headlines heralding “Europe’s Vaccine Disaster”, the EU has managed to overtake the United States in the share of the people vaccinated against COVID-19. At the time of writing, 56.66% of the EU’s population have received at least one dose, compared to 55.86% in the United States. The White House is struggling to overcome vaccine skepticism in several states. President Joe Biden recently accused Facebook of “killing people” because of what he thinks are the platform’s insufficient efforts to control vaccine misinformation. 

 

EDITOR'S CHOICE

After devastating floods, Europe sets sights on climate adaptation 

 

 

Europe is mourning the more than 200 lives tragically lost in devastating floods across Belgium and Germany. The scale of the destruction is staggering: our reporter Jack Parrock visited Pepinster, near Liège, and witnessed the ravages caused by the extreme flooding. As rescue efforts continue, it becomes increasingly clear that some of the worst-hit areas were simply unprepared to deal with this kind of deadly phenomena. The disaster is a stark reminder of the dangers that low-lying cities across the world face, including those in high-income countries, as a result of manmade climate change. Research has shown that a warmer atmosphere can hold more moisture, paving the way for sudden torrential downpours that engorge waterways and cause them to overflow. “A lot of climate change is already baked into the system,” a climate expert told Jack. “We've already put a significant amount of gases into the atmosphere so we now need to prepare.” But how exactly can European cities protect themselves from flooding? The answer lies in climate adaptation.

 

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Western Europe was not the only region to be battered by extreme weather this month. At least twelve people died after torrential rains flooded a subway in the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou, as shocking images showed passengers struggling against chest-high water inside a train carriage. Around 200,000 city residents were evacuated, with soldiers leading rescue efforts in the city of over 10 million people, where days of rain have inundated the streets and subway. 

 

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Sju år i folkskola, det du! Fucks ADHD!:heat:

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